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Insurance Scheme Proposed for Human Wildlife Conflict Crisis

The recently-released, three-part report on Human Wildlife Conflict and compensation is out. You can read your own personal copy here.

The reports offer the following highlights:

  • Communities want a faster and much more efficient compensation payments that are timely and not delayed.
  • They want a faster response to reported incidences especially human injuries;
  • They want assistance for human injuries to be taken to hospital
  • They want for the immediate families of the dead to be offer consoling.
  • They want more focus on prevention.
  • They want the list of animals causing conflicts/problems to be amended in the WCMA 2013 (something that has been under discussion for 6 years!)
  • They want KWS to learn from the small-scale HWC consolation schemes that are implemented by non-state actors (private conservancies and donors).

The Task Force recommends the establishment of a HWC Insurance Scheme to manage risks and administer liabilities on four categories of HWC (human death and injury, property damage, crop destruction, and livestock predation).

The Task Force also recommends that personal bodily injury and human death from wildlife as per

the schedule is provided based on the Continental Scale of Benefits (insurance policy terminology for human injury or death), including a proposed maximum of KES 3,000,000  ($30,000) for human death.

The proposed management structure of the revised human wildlife compensation scheme recognizes devolution and links case management to county and ward levels. But the funding of such a structure again puts the onus on an over-taxed tourism sector, and conservation levies and payment for ecosystem services – both of which are ill-defined and have not been effective income generating tools in Kenya. Finally the scheme will also depend on donor financing.

There is no talk of premium payments in support of the insurance program (a common practice in all insurance policies), and there are no incentives/benefits accruing to individuals and communities already practicing HWC mitigation and management.

(It’s like so many health insurances – where they pay for treatment but not for prevention/good practices!!)

A new fund, called the Human Wildlife Co-existence Fund, will be managed by a new parastatal board.

The HWC insurance scheme will be piloted for 8 months in the Taita Taveta, Kajiado, Narok, and Meru to test the claims administration process and tools. The results of this pilot will be crucial in adjusting the scheme before country-wide roll out.

Want a printed copy of these reports? Please contact communications@laikipia.org  for yours.

 

 

 

 

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